1. Women’s Everyday Stressors Leading to Bruxism

    11th November 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    dentist TMJ teeth grinding,Increasing numbers of women are grinding their teeth in their sleep. Teeth grinding will in most instances be noted by a partner. A dentist can help with this serious problem.

    Key takeaways:

    •   An estimated 6 million people in Britain suffer from bruxism with an increasing number of cases in middle-aged women.
    •     Bruxism may cause problems such as migraines, jaw pain, earaches, and chipped tooth enamel among others.
    •  The major cause of bruxism is stress. Everyday stressors such as juggling jobs, family, childcare and ageing parents are predisposing women to teeth grinding.

    When we sleep, any worries or concerns we have, even if only in our subconscious mind, can lead to clenching, nocturnal grinding and, in some cases, pain and dysfunction of the jaw muscles.

    Read the full story here

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3921612/Why-successful-women-started-grinding-teeth-stress-strain-juggling-jobs-childcare-looking-ageing-parents.html


  2. Sensitive teeth? The team at The Courtyard Clinic can help!

    10th April 2014 by thecourtyardclinic

    For_sensitive_teeth1

     

    Sensitive teeth is a very common reason for our patients to come and see us. There are many reasons behind sensitive teeth, here are some of the most common:

    • Brushing injuries: usually on the outer surfaces of the teeth facing the lips and the cheeks. Brushing hard can damage the gums and make them recede, exposing the sensitive root surface. The root surface is not covered with the hard enamel, which makes it vulnerable to hard brushing and more damage.
    • Grinding/clenching: If you grind/clench your teeth, small cracks can develop in the tooth enamel making it sensitive to temperature changes or sweet and sour.
    • Drinking acidic juices or fizzy drinks frequently: Frequent consumption of these beverages dissolves the hard enamel and the sensitive dentine is exposed.
    • Bulimia: a characteristic of this eating disorder is self-induced vomiting. This exposes the teeth to the acidic content of the stomach leading to the dissolving of the enamel and the exposing of the sensitive dentine.
    • Bad habits: such as biting nails or pens.
    • Broken teeth or broken fillings.
    • Gum disease: If you suffer from gum disease, the gums around the teeth will recede and the sensitive part of the teeth is exposed.

    If you experience teeth sensitivity, come and see the team at The Courtyard Clinic for treatment. This may vary depending on the cause.

    There are many products that you can buy over the counter or you can get from your dentist to treat the symptoms of teeth sensitivity.

    Tips to minimise teeth sensitivity:

    • If you are a hard-brusher change to a softer toothbrush
    • Use toothpastes for sensitive teeth
    • Use mouthwashes containing fluoride to strengthen the teeth
    • If you are a grinder/clencher you need to see your dentist who will provide you with a bite guard to protect your teeth from the grinding forces.
    • If you have broken teeth or fillings see your dentist for treatment.

    If you have sensitive teeth and would like to do something about it contact Alison and the team at The Courtyard Clinic on 01932 582 949 or book an appointment on line by clicking the link on our homepage.


  3. Call us if you loose a filling!

    17th February 2014 by thecourtyardclinic


  4. Prevention is better than the cure- Fissure sealants for children in Surrey

    30th December 2013 by thecourtyardclinic

    fissure-sealant-by-dentist

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends placing dental sealants on the first permanent molars (at around 6 years of age) and the second permanent molars (which come in around 12 years of age).

    Why? –Well, basically there are a lot of studies that say placing sealants helps reduce the incidence of cavities. Does it mean you will never get cavities?–no, it still can happen, but sealants can reduce the kind of cavities that form in the pits and grooves of the back teeth,  on the top of the tooth–you still can get them in between the teeth and on the smooth surfaces.

    How long do they last?–Even with a well placed sealant, dentists do see cavities form in areas previously sealed. Sometimes the sealant wears off (chewing ice for instance), or sometimes just because someone is very prone to cavities. They last from 5 to 7 years if you take care of them–even adults can get sealants, but they seem to be most effective in the cavity prone years of youth. What is the material? It is the same material as used in white fillings without as much filler/reinforcing material, it’s a bis-GMA resin, With less filler the sealant can flow into the grooves better as shown in the picture above. Sometimes we use “flowable” composite which is in between in it’s characteristics.

    Does it hurt?–We like to say it’s like painting fingernails–it is just painted on the tooth–now that can be harder than you think as these teeth are in the back of the mouth. Most of the effort is keeping the area dry.

    Do you put them on baby teeth?–you can, but generally no. The enamel in baby teeth is different microscopically, they don’t seem to stay as well. It is often better to simply have regular checkups to catch things early. Also, many cavities in baby teeth are in between the teeth which sealants do not prevent.

    If you feel your child has not had fissure sealants placed and would like to protect their back teeth through the difficult years of childhood then contact Alison for an appointment at The Courtyard Clinic on 01932582949 or email on reception@thecourtyardclinic.com .

     


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