1. Learn More about Teeth Grinding

    31st October 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    smile teeth beauty Teeth grinding can be caused by tense jaw muscles or by a misaligned bite. Avoid chewing on objects such as pens and pencils, as well as chewing gum, since it leads to jaw clenching.

    Key takeaways:

    • Teeth grinding can be caused by anxiety, stress, sleep apnoea, other sleep disorders, and abnormal bite.
    • A sore jaw and a dull headache upon waking up may signal the problem of teeth grinding.
    •   You dentist will fit you with a mouthguard to prevent any further damage to the teeth. The underlying cause should be addressed to finally stop the grinding.

    The problem of teeth grinding is not limited to adults. Approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times — when their baby teeth emerge and when their permanent teeth come in.

    Read the full story here

    www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/teeth-grinding-bruxism#1


  2. Your Next Dental Appointment Might Protect You from Pneumonia

    by thecourtyardclinic

    teeth smile beautyYour mouth contains lots of bacteria that are both useful and harmful to your health. You cannot get rid of all these bacteria, but regular dental cleaning eliminates “bad” bacteria that leads to health problems like pneumonia.

    Key takeaways:

    • Previous research has already established a connection between pneumonia and oral health.
    • Numerous microbes (bacteria, viruses) in the mouth are beneficial, but in certain conditions may lead to diseases.
    • Pneumonia-causing bacteria are inhaled, and regular dental cleaning will help to eliminate these bacteria.

    In her presentation, Dr. Doll acknowledged that people who see their dentist regularly are also likely to practice other healthy-mouth behaviors (like brushing and flossing regularly). They may also have healthier behaviors in general, which might affect their pneumonia risk, as well.

    Read the full story here

    http://www.health.com/oral-health/teeth-cleaning-pneumonia-risk


  3. Coconut Pulling is No Better that Chewing Gum

    29th October 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    smile teeth beautyResearchers are finding the truth about coconut oil in dental health — that it leads to more plaque formation.

    Key takeaways:

    • Coconut oil is thought to pull out toxins from the mouth as these particles adhere to the fat and are then spat out.
    • Coconut oil was put to the test against sugar-free chewing gum to find out which of the two is the best in fighting off plaque.
    • Coconut oil was found to make the teeth dirtier and caused an increase in the levels of plaque in the entire mouth.

    We’re looking at a few of the ridiculous myths that are out there and trying to delve into them, and figure out what the truth is. The idea is to empower people to be a bit more knowledgeable about their own health.

    Read the full story here

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3866922/Can-coconut-pulling-REALLY-perfect-smile-Bake-s-Tamal-puts-beauty-treatment-beloved-listers-including-Gwyneth-Paltrow-test.html


  4. Fossil Analysis of Teeth Reveals Human Diets

    28th October 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    smile teeth beauty Comparison of different teeth can helps show differences in diet across periods in the lifetime on an individual. Wisdom teeth that appear much later will have different information to the canines.

    Key takeaways:

    • Teeth are preserved very well when fossilized and hold lots of information in the form of isotopes. Newer and more advanced techniques have helped to study teeth.
    • Thick enamel on the molars indicates that they were used for crushing foods such as grinding seeds or crushing the marrow out of bones.
    • Dental microwear refers to the marks left behind by food on teeth that result from food particles being dragged across and pressed into our teeth.

    Teeth from more recent fossils reveal more because they have more isotopes preserved in them. For example, the nitrogen in the teeth of Neanderthals can reveal whether the protein they ate came from plants or animals.

    Read the full story here

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/10/25/497094756/dental-detectives-what-fossil-teeth-reveal-about-ancestral-human-diets

     


  5. Food to Avoid or Love for the Period to New Year’s

    27th October 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    smile beauty healthDo not avoid the platter of cheese at your next dinner setting. Cheese is quite good for your teeth since it contains casein that protects teeth from cavities.

    Key takeaways:

    • Spinach, kale and other green vegetables are good for healthy teeth. They require more chewing which  helps to release more saliva that washes the teeth.
    • Avoid too much citrus foods such as oranges, lemons, and lime that are highly acidic and cause erosion of tooth enamel. Citrus fruits can be enjoyed with large meals to limit damage to the teeth.
    • Candy should be avoided due to the high sugar content that fuels bacterial activity in the mouth.

    In general, you don’t need to deprive yourself of your favorite fall and winter treats to maintain a healthy mouth — just be sensible. “You can eat anything in moderation,” says Dr. Messina. “And make sure you brush twice a day, floss once a day, and see your dentist regularly.”

    Read the full story here

    www.everydayhealth.com/hs/dental-health/fall-winter-seasonal-foods-pictures/


  6. Stress May Affect Your Oral Health

    26th October 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    smile beauty teethDid you know that stress may cause problems in your mouth? Stress is linked to a number of conditions that affect the gums, teeth and mouth.

    Key takeaways:

    • Foul mood caused by stress may cause people to skip routine oral healthcare tasks such as brushing and flossing. Stress also causes poor eating habits that lead to poor oral health.
    • Stress causes cold sores and mouth ulcers since it leads to compromised immunity.
    • Teeth grinding is linked with stress and will cause damage to teeth.

    Stress can lead to depression, and depressed patients, according to research, have twice the risk of an unfavorable outcome from gum disease treatment compared to those who are not depressed.

    Read the full story here

    www.webmd.boots.com/oral-health/guide/how-stress-affects-your-oral-health


  7. Got dentures? Dental implants improve your life

    by thecourtyardclinic

    smile teeth beautyIf you’ve worn dentures, a dental implant can make those dentures more secure – so they become like your natural teeth.

    Key takeaways:

    • Dental implants are the next best thing to having your own teeth, as they look and feel natural.
    • Implants can replace a single tooth, several teeth or all your teeth.
    • A dental implant can make dentures more secure, so they are like your natural teeth.

    The dental implant, typically made of titanium, serves as the replacement for the tooth root – the very foundation of a natural tooth. Because it is placed in the jawbone and fuses with your natural bone, the dental implant forms a sturdy base for your replacement teeth.

    Read more:

    http://www.aaid-implant.org/about-dental-implants/what-are-the-benefits-of-dental-implants-over-other-treatments/


  8. Brushing Teeth Helps Cut Risk of Heart Disease

    25th October 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    health smile teethThe Irish Dental Association has espoused the multiple benefits of practicing good oral hygiene. Brushing and flossing the teeth has the benefit of lowering the risk of heart attack, research shows.

    Key takeaways:

    • New research indicates that thoroughly brushing the teeth to remove plaque will reduce inflammation in the body in effect preventing stroke and heart attacks.
    • Periodontal disease is closely associated with coronary heart disease. It also shares a number of risk factors with cardiovascular diseases and chronic diseases.
    • The benefits of brushing extend to inflammatory diseases and conditions such as arthritis, diabetes and Crohn’s disease.

    President of the Irish Dental Association, Dr PJ Byrne, said that improving oral hygiene by better, more efficient brushing and cleaning between the teeth is likely to have a systemic health benefit.

    Read the full story here

    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/health/brushing-teeth-helps-to-cut-heart-attack-risk-35145620.html


  9. Oral Health Facts for a Less Scary Halloween

    24th October 2016 by thecourtyardclinic

    smile beauty teethHalloween is certainly filled with chocolates, sweets and other snacks. Sugar intake for children should be limited to 33g per day.

    Key takeaways:

    • Have alkaline foods such as milk and cheese on Halloween night to help neutralize the buildup of acid in the mouth.
    • Parents should stop their children from eating sweets and chocolates at least one hour before bedtime on Halloween.
    • Children should be supervised when brushing their teeth before they finally retire for bed on Halloween.

    It is not the amount of sweets consumed that cause tooth decay – it is how often they are eaten. Sugar causes the bacteria in plaque to produce acids. It is these acids which attack children’s tooth enamel and cause tooth decay.

    Read the full story here

    http://www.dentistry.co.uk/2011/10/27/oral-facts-and-tips-healthier-halloween/


  10. The CDC Says That Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    by thecourtyardclinic

    smile teeth beautyThe CDC report indicates the majority of children still do not have dental sealants. The dental sealants are ultimately used to protect teeth from dental cavities.

    Key takeaways:

    • Dental sealants are highly effective in preventing cavities in the permanent back teeth of children.
    • Children from low income families are at high risk of teeth cavities but are less likely to have dental sealants compared to those from higher income families.
    • Providing dental sealants through school-based programs to the low-income children has been projected to save up to $300 million in dental treatment costs.

    State officials play an important role in increasing children’s access to school-based dental sealant programs (SPSP) in their states. Officials can target school-based sealant programs to the areas of greatest need in their state.

    Read the full story here

    https://www.cdc.gov/media/dpk/other/dental-sealants/vs-dental-sealants.html


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